How to Easily Configure WiFi in Raspberry Pi

Any version of Raspberry Pi can be very easily configured with WiFi access. Coupled with ssh or vnc, it allows you to manage your Pi remotely. Here is the simplest way I could think of, illustrated by a screenshot and detailed below.
Once your Raspberry Pi boots up, you will get to this shiny screen. Now open a Terminal by clicking on the black square icon on top-left of the screen.Screenshot from 2017-01-04 11-29-18
This opens a Terminal where you type in:
sudo leafpad /etc/network/interfaces
This opens up a notepad-like editor. Make three changes to the text as shown in the highlighted section:

  1. Change manual to dhcp in the line starting with “iface wlan0”
  2. Replace wifi_id with the Wireless Access ID / SSID
  3. Replace password with your actual password for Wireless Access

Now save it (Ctrl-S) like notepad and exit it. The terminal should still remain open.
Now either reboot the Pi or restart the network with the following command on Terminal (don’t forget to press <Enter> after you typed):
sudo service networking restart
Wait for a few minutes for the WiFi to come up. On latest Raspbian with PIXEL, you can verify by seeing the two blue arrows in opposite direction, as can be seen from the screenshot.

Steps to secure and protect your Skype account from Hacking

Skype accounts are being hacked since at least August last year. Breached Skype accounts are used to send thousands of spam messages before they’re locked by Microsoft. The owners then have to regain access and that is when most find out about it. Skype has fallen victim to similar attacks before, and hackers were able to spoof messages on the system in 2015 after using lists of stolen usernames and passwords to gain access to accounts.
Problem
This wave of attack appears to be growing in size, and Skype users who opted for Microsoft’s two-factor security are also vulnerable. Microsoft offers the ability to link a Skype and Microsoft Account together to make sign-in and security easier. It turns out that Microsoft keeps your original Skype account password separate so that it can still be used to access the service with a Skype username. If that password isn’t secure then hackers can use it to gain access to your Skype account, bypassing any two-factor authentication provided by Microsoft. Essentially Microsoft has left a backdoor open to their vaunted two-factor security! It can be safely assumed that the new wave of attack is dictionary based and Skype / Microsoft allows unlimited login tries at some entry point.
Solution
The solution, in brief, is to switch to Microsoft’s two-factor security and then disable access by old method.
1. Update your Skype account to a Microsoft account:

  • Go to https://account.microsoft.com, if you’re already signed in, sign out.
  • Enter your Skype name and password when prompted and then select
  • Sign in.
  • If your Skype account is not updated already, you will be notified to update your account.
  • Select Next to continue.
  • You will be asked to add an email to your account, and verify that email.
  • Congrats, your Skype account is also a Microsoft account.

2. Ensure that your Accounts are fully merged:

  • Go to https://account.microsoft.com, if you’re already signed in, sign out.
  • Enter your Skype name, not your Microsoft Account email address, and use your Skype password to sign-in
  • If you’ve linked your Microsoft Account previously, you’ll be prompted to sign-in and merge the accounts to create a Skype alias

3. Disable Skype alias:
Once the two accounts are properly merged, Microsoft creates a Skype alias to let you keep signing in with a Skype username. Disable it under the aliases preferences, to ensure complete protection.